Reading list on ReSTIR

Recently a short video from dark magic programmer Tomasz Stachowiak made the rounds in the graphics programming community, at the sound of jaws hitting the floor in its wake. It shows his recent progress on in his renderer pet project: beautiful real-time global illumination with fast convergence and barely any noise, in a static environment with dynamic lighting.

In a Twitter thread where he discussed some details, one keyword in particular caught my attention: ReSTIR.

ReSTIR stands for “Reservoir-based Spatio-Temporal Importance Resampling” and is a sampling technique published at SIGGRAPH 2020 and getting refined since.

The original publication

Spatiotemporal reservoir resampling for real-time ray tracing with dynamic direct lighting
The publication page includes the recording of the SIGGRAPH presentation, with a well articulated explanation of the technique by main author Benedikt Bitterli.
(same publication hosted on the NVidia website).

Explanations of ReSTIR

Improvements over the original publication

After the initial publication, NVidia published a refined version producing images with less noise at a lower cost, which they call “RTXDI” (for RTX Direct Illumination).

Other limitations

When discussing on Twitter some of the limitations of ReSTIR, Chris Wyman made the following remarks:

To be clear, right now, ReSTIR is a box of razor blades without handles (or a box of unlabeled knobs). It’s extremely powerful, but you have to know what you’re doing. It is not intuitive, if your existing perspective is traditional Monte Carlo (or real-time) sampling techniques.

People sometimes think SIGGRAPH paper = solved. Nope. We’ve learned a lot since the first paper, and our direct lighting is a lot more stable with that knowledge. We’re still learning how to do it well on full-length paths.

And there’s a bunch of edge cases, even in direct lighting, that we know how to solve but haven’t had time to write them up, polish, and demo.

We haven’t actually tried to solve the extra noise at disocclusions in (what I think of as) a very principled way. Right now a world-space structure is probably the best way. I’m pretty sure it can be done without a (formal) world-space structure, just “more ReSTIR.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.